Past Events


 

On Wednesday, October 28, the Asan Institute for Policy Studies held a Closed Workshop with Christopher Griffin, Executive Director of Foreign policy Initiative (FPI) and Thomas Karako, Senior Fellow with the International Security Program and Director of the Missile Defense Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). The latest US Department of Defense Ballistic Missile Defense Review revealed that ballistic missile threats around the world is growing in both quantity and quality. Regionally, the continual development of nuclear delivery capability in North Korea coupled with the steady pace of defense modernization in China only contributes to this trend. This closed workshop aimed to assess the nature of these threats in Northeast Asia and explore options available for South Korea as it attempts to manage this growing threat.

Griffin began with an overview of the “Security Context and the Ballistic Missile Threat in Northeast Asia” followed by Karako’s analysis on “Ways Forward: Options for Missile Defense in South Korea.”

 

Date/Time: Wednesday, October 28, 2015 / 2:00pm – 4:00am
Place: Conference Room (2F), The Asan Institute for Policy Studies

 

Chris Griffin joined the Foreign Policy Initiative (FPI) as Executive Director in January 2013. Previously, he served as legislative director to Senator Joseph I. Lieberman (ID-CT), advising the senator on the full range of legislative proposals and key votes. Between 2008 and 2011, he was Senator Lieberman’s military legislative assistant, in which capacity he developed the senator’s legislative agenda as a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee and chairman of its Airland Subcommittee.

Thomas Karako is a senior fellow with the International Security Program and the director of the Missile Defense Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where he arrived in 2014 as a fellow with the Project on Nuclear Issues. His research focuses on national security, U.S. nuclear forces, missile defense, and public law. He is also an assistant professor of political science and director of the Center for the Study of American Democracy at Kenyon College, where he arrived in 2009.